Saturday, 14 May 2016

No Avengers member called or threatened Ibe Kachikwu - Militants




Against the backdrop of claims by the Minister of State for Petroleum Re­sources, Dr. Ibe Kachikwu, that a militant called to threaten him on phone, the Niger Delta Aveng­ers have said that no member of the group or its agent called nor threatened the life of the minister.

In a statement by the spokes­man of The Avengers, Col. Mu­doch Agbinibo, and posted on the Avengers website, the group de­nied that any agent or representa­tive called the minister for what­ever reason.

In a similar development, Ag­binibo called on all internation­al oil companies, indigenous oil firms and contractors to shun an­yone who ever calls for any rea­son saying he is a member of the group and making demands that are not in tune with the objective of The Avengers.

He said that the aim of the avengers is far beyond threaten­ing lives of Nigerians but its aim is agitating for the total freedom and liberation of the Niger Delta peo­ple and making them have control over their resources.

“No agent or representative of the Avengers has called the Min­ister of State for Petroleum Re­sources and the Group Managing Director, Nigerian National Petro­leum Corporation (NNPC), Dr. Ibe Kachikwu to threaten his life.

“To all international oil com­panies, indigenous oil companies and all contractors, if anyone call saying they are members of aveng­ers, please do not listen or take them serious because our ideolo­gy and belief is far from that”, the spokesman said.

The statement further warned that should the Federal Govern­ment fail to meet their demands, the Avengers will continue to blow up the pipelines until the Nigerian economy is brought to level zero, saying as at present, it has record­ed 50 percent success.
It also said that by October 2016, it will display its currency, flag, passport, ruling and its terri­tory to the world.

The group called on the Unit­ed Nations to join the liberation voice of the Niger Delta and free the people from the environmen­tal pollution, slavery, and oppres­sion by the government of Nige­ria.
---