Wednesday, 4 May 2016

Pres. Buhari meets Biya over Boko Haram




Nigerian President, President Muhammadu Buhari on Tuesday met behind closed doors for over two hours with the visiting President of Cameroon, Paul Biya, over terrorism and other trans-border crimes.
The meeting, which was held inside the Presidential Villa, Abuja, started at about 2pm and ended around 4.30pm.
Biya is currently on a two-day official visit to Nigeria.
He arrived at the Presidential Villa with his wife, Chantal, and other members of his entourage at about 2pm.
He was received on arrival at the forecourt of the Presidential Villa by Buhari, his wife, Aisha; some ministers and other top government officials.
The visiting President was honoured with a 21-gun salute before he proceeded to inspect a guard of honour by soldiers attached to the Brigade of Guards.
Both leaders did not address journalists at the end of the meeting.
The Presidency said the Presidents would address a joint press conference at the Transcorp Hilton Hotel, Abuja, on Wednesday.
It also said a joint communiqué on the visit and the talks between the two presidents and their officials would be issued before Biya’s departure from Abuja on Wednesday.
The Special Adviser to the President on Media and Publicity, Mr. Femi Adesina, had on Monday issued a statement saying that both leaders and their officials would discuss issues of common interest to Nigeria and Cameroon.
The issues, according to Adesina, include the ongoing bilateral and regional cooperation against terrorism, violent extremism and cross-border crimes.
Meanwhile, the United States government said that Nigeria had a great future and would overcome her challenges.
This was stated by the US Ambassador to Nigeria, James Entwistle, during a visit to the Tomaro Island, which comprises about 26 communities located near the Apapa port in Amuwo Odofin Local Government Area of Lagos State.
Entwistle drew similarities between the United States and Nigeria even as he expressed the optimism that Nigeria would overcome her challenges like the US did.
Entwistle said, “The United States and Nigeria have many things in common. Of course, two different countries but we have many things in common. If you look at the histories of our countries, both used to be British colonies and had to take off the cloak of colonialism.
“In my country, almost 100 years after independence, we had a civil war that almost broke my country apart. Nigeria, as well, has experienced civil war, and I think the fact  that both countries came through these experiences has made us much stronger.”
In 2012, volunteers from the US Consulate built a clinic on Tomaro Island and have conducted medical outreach twice to residents of the island  who needed improved medical services.
During his visit, Ambassador Entwistle toured the health facility and Tomaro-Onisiwo Junior and Senior Secondary School, which was founded in 2009 by an American schoolteacher and founder of The Nigerian School Project, Deena Grushkin.
Entwistle also interacted with some of the pupils during his visit and noted that he was impressed with their potential and future goals.
Also speaking during the visit, the school’s principal, Mrs. G.O. Akinlosotu, thanked the US  ambassador for his visit and the goodwill extended towards the school’s  development.
In the same vein, Rev. Andrew Duya, the founder and director of First Education Support Centre, which partnered with Grushkin, praised the performance of the  pupils since the school was established.
---